robot-surgeons-are-the-future-of-medicine

Welcome to Clip from Spiral logo

Interactive video lesson plan for: Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine

Activity overview:

Share on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/11mi0da

DISCLAIMER: Surgical imagery depicted. Not for the easily squeamish! // Medical technology is getting weirder everyday -- in a good way. Robotic surgery and computer-assisted medicine are already doing amazing things right now -- just look at the da Vinci Surgical System! Are you ready to ditch the hospital and buy a robot surgeon for the home?

Let's say you have to have a dangerous surgical procedure. Which would you choose? The best human surgeon alive today, or the best robot surgeon from 50 years in the future? Let us know your decision and why in the comments below!
--------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to Fw:Thinking:
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=fwthinking

For the audio podcast, blog and more, visit the Fw:Thinking website:
http://www.fwthinking.com

Fw:Thinking on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/fwthinking

Jonathan Stickland on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jonstrickland

Fw:Thinking on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/FWThinking01

Fw:Thinking on Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/108500616405453822675/


[TRANSCRIPT]:
RoboCop, Robodog, Robo...doctor?

Alright, medical technology is getting weirder by the day. But I mean that in a good way. Take the iKnife for example. It's a surgical knife that actually vaporizes tissue, and then analyzes the smoke that comes out so that a surgeon can know if she's cutting into cancerous cells, or healthy margins. Or what about mechanical leeches? They pretty much do what medicinal leeches do, only with less chance of a bacterial infection and a lot less...writhing.

There's only so much improvement you can do to a tool before you eventually have to turn your attention to the hand that holds that tool. And that's where robotic surgery comes in. So do you remember the autonomous surgery pod in Ridley Scott's Prometheus? How far away are we from something like that? Well, not as far away as you might think.

You see, robotic surgery and computer-assisted medicine are already doing amazing things right now. And the potential for what they could do in the future could change medicine forever! One of the most common surgical robots is the da Vinci line. Da Vinci is focused on translating a surgeon's control movements into direct action upon a patient. So every time a human moves, the robot moves. Unless of course a T-Rex happens to be walking by, in which case the robot actually filters out any of those little hand tremors. So that way you get pure control. No error.

Another advantage of robot surgeons is the chance for telesurgery. So lets assume that you're some sort of futuristic penguin research scientist and you're on assignment off the coast of Antarctica, when suddenly you need an appendectomy. But your ship is completely trapped by ice and your ship's surgeon has been, I don't know, kidnapped by ice pirates or something. What do you do? Well essentially you Skype it in. A surgeon on the mainland sits down at a terminal and supervises robotically assisted telesurgery via satellite uplink.

Another advantage is minimally invasive procedures. Now see traditional open surgery can leave big scars, they can take a long time to heal, and there's a lot of pain involved in recovery. But what if instead of making a four inch incision in your stomach, we were able to do the same procedure using instruments put through little half-inch holes. Now human doctors have been doing minimally invasive procedures for years, but honestly there's only so much human hands can do through these tiny holes in your skin. But robotic precision means those incisions have gotten smaller and smaller over time. And if we continue through this miniaturization rabbit hole, who knows? Maybe one day there'll be barely a notion of what an in-patient procedure is.

Now the future for robotic surgery is wide open. Just take a look at what people have created with the Raven line. This is an open-source robotic surgeon and, sure, it looks like a couple of mechanical spider arms, but the important thing here is research. You see it creates a common platform for people to do experiments which will determine the future of robotic surgery.

But beyond all that, instead of just talking about robotic assisted surgeries, lets talk about their full potential. We're talking autonomous robot surgeons. With machine learning, a robot surgeon could potentially study all the information from successful procedures in the past and apply that to learn how to do those procedures in the future. And if they prove to be as good or better than human surgeons, maybe we wouldn't even go to hospitals to have surgery. Instead if you expected to have a surgery, you might buy a robot surgeon for the home, or for the office, or for the spacecraft.

Tagged under: Robotics,robot,surgery,Robot surgeon,robotic surgery,robotic surgeries,medicine,medical technology,computer assisted medicine,surgical robot,telesurgery, invasive surgery,emerging technologies,future trends,da vinci robot,da vinci surgery,iknife,mechanical leeches,hysterectomy,bypass,cancer,Prometheus,da vinci robotics,da vinci surgeon,davinci robot,raven,future,futurology,futurism,science,technology,jonathan strickland

Find more lesson plans like this:

Advances in Medicine During the 19th Century: Theories & Achievements

Clip makes it super easy to turn any public video into a formative assessment activity in your classroom.

Add multiple choice quizzes, questions and browse hundreds of approved, video lesson ideas for Clip

Make YouTube one of your teaching aids - Works perfectly with lesson micro-teaching plans

Play this activity

1. Students enter a simple code

2. You play the video

3. The students comment

4. You review and reflect

* Whiteboard required for teacher-paced activities

Share on:

Share Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine on Google+ Share Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine on Twitter Share Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine on Facebook Pin Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine Email Robot Surgeons are the Future of Medicine

Ready to see what else Spiral logo can do?

With four apps, each designed around existing classroom activities, Spiral gives you the power to do formative assessment with anything you teach.

Quickfire

Carry out a quickfire formative assessment to see what the whole class is thinking

Discuss

Create interactive presentations to spark creativity in class

Team Up

Student teams can create and share collaborative presentations from linked devices

Clip

Turn any public video into a live chat with questions and quizzes

1000s of teachers use Spiral to deliver awesome, engaging activities that capture students' understanding during lessons.

Now it's your turn Sign up

Spiral Reviews by Teachers and Digital Learning Coaches

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Kathryn Laster @kklaster

Tried out the canvas response option on @SpiralEducation & it's so awesome! Add text or drawings AND annotate an image! #R10tech

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Room 220 Math Stars @3rdgradeBCE

Using @SpiralEducation in class for math review. Student approved! Thumbs up! Thanks.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Miss Ord @ordmiss

Absolutely amazing collaboration from year 10 today. 100% engagement and constant smiles from all #lovetsla #spiral

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Adam J. Stryker @strykerstennis

Students show better Interpersonal Writing skills than Speaking via @SpiralEducation Great #data #langchat folks!

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Dr Ayla Göl @iladylayla

A good tool for supporting active #learning.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Brett Erenberg @BrettErenberg

The Team Up app is unlike anything I have ever seen. You left NOTHING out! So impressed!

Get the Clip Chrome Extension & Create Video Lessons in Seconds

Add Clip to Chrome