RI 5.7

By Jennifer Brewer 22 Jan 20:40
11 slides
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ELAGSE5RI7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.World War I

The United States paid a price for its growing status in world politics. In 1914 war broke out in Europe. On one side were the Central Powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria. On the other side were the Allies—more than 20 nations led by Britain and France. The United States tried to remain neutral. The American people reelected President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 partly because he had kept the country out of the war. By 1917, however, the United States found it impossible to remain outside the struggle. Soon after German submarines began sinking U.S. ships, the United States declared war on the Central Powers. Two million U.S. soldiers helped the Allies to victory on the battlefields of Europe. The fighting ended in November 1918. (See also World War I.)

The peace treaty that officially ended the war was signed in Versailles, France, in 1919. President Wilson insisted that the treaty provide for the creation of the League of Nations. This organization was designed to maintain peace among the countries of the world. The United States Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles, however. As a result, the United States never joined the League of Nations.
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RI 5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.World War I: The First Modern War
First Facts About U.S. History. 1996.

1914: An assassination in Bosnia touches off World War I
President Woodrow Wilson declares the United States neutral
1917: The United States enters the war
1918: An armistice ends the war
1920: The U.S. Senate rejects American membership in the League of Nations
“We crouched in our trenches,” an American soldier wrote, “peering past the rolls of barbed wire and ‘no man’s land,’ dreading the command that would send us ‘over the top.’”

World War I, which began in Europe in August 1914, was the first war fought with modern weapons, such as tanks, machine guns, and submarines. The United States tried to remain neutral as the Central Powers, led by Germany, engaged in a deadly struggle against the Allied Powers, led by Great Britain and France. As both sides dug deep down in trenches along a 600-mile war front, the loss of life was devastating. In one battle that lasted six months, 650,000 men were killed or wounded—but only a few square miles of land changed hands.

The United States entered the war on the Allied side in 1917, partly because German submarines had preyed on American ships. Although Americans came late to the conflict, they played a key role. In the fall of 1918, more than a million American soldiers fought through the Argonne Forest in France for 47 days. The massive assault helped break the last German offensive. Germany finally agreed to an armistice on November 11, 1918. Hoping to avoid a future world war, the nations of the world formed the League of Nations in 1919. But the brutality of the war had convinced most Americans that it was best to stay out of “Europe’s wars,” and the United States refused to join the League.
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World War I

The United States paid a price for its growing status in world politics. In 1914 war broke out in Europe. On one side were the Central Powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria. On the other side were the Allies—more than 20 nations led by Britain and France. The United States tried to remain neutral. The American people reelected President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 partly because he had kept the country out of the war. By 1917, however, the United States found it impossible to remain outside the struggle. Soon after German submarines began sinking U.S. ships, the United States declared war on the Central Powers. Two million U.S. soldiers helped the Allies to victory on the battlefields of Europe. The fighting ended in November 1918. (See also World War I.)

The peace treaty that officially ended the war was signed in Versailles, France, in 1919. President Wilson insisted that the treaty provide for the creation of the League of Nations. This organization was designed to maintain peace among the countries of the world. The United States Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles, however. As a result, the United States never joined the League of Nations.
World War I: The First Modern War
First Facts About U.S. History. 1996.

1914: An assassination in Bosnia touches off World War I
President Woodrow Wilson declares the United States neutral
1917: The United States enters the war
1918: An armistice ends the war
1920: The U.S. Senate rejects American membership in the League of Nations
“We crouched in our trenches,” an American soldier wrote, “peering past the rolls of barbed wire and ‘no man’s land,’ dreading the command that would send us ‘over the top.’”

World War I, which began in Europe in August 1914, was the first war fought with modern weapons, such as tanks, machine guns, and submarines. The United States tried to remain neutral as the Central Powers, led by Germany, engaged in a deadly struggle against the Allied Powers, led by Great Britain and France. As both sides dug deep down in trenches along a 600-mile war front, the loss of life was devastating. In one battle that lasted six months, 650,000 men were killed or wounded—but only a few square miles of land changed hands.

The United States entered the war on the Allied side in 1917, partly because German submarines had preyed on American ships. Although Americans came late to the conflict, they played a key role. In the fall of 1918, more than a million American soldiers fought through the Argonne Forest in France for 47 days. The massive assault helped break the last German offensive. Germany finally agreed to an armistice on November 11, 1918. Hoping to avoid a future world war, the nations of the world formed the League of Nations in 1919. But the brutality of the war had convinced most Americans that it was best to stay out of “Europe’s wars,” and the United States refused to join the League.

Slides in RI 5.7

ELAGSE5RI7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
World War I The United States paid a price for its growing status in world politics. In 1914 war broke out in Europe. On one side were the Central Powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria. On the other side were the Allies—more than 20 nations led by Britain and France. The United States tried to remain neutral. The American people reelected President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 partly because he had kept the country out of the war. By 1917, however, the United States found it impossible to remain outside the struggle. Soon after German submarines began sinking U.S. ships, the United States declared war on the Central Powers. Two million U.S. soldiers helped the Allies to victory on the battlefields of Europe. The fighting ended in November 1918. (See also World War I.) The peace treaty that officially ended the war was signed in Versailles, France, in 1919. President Wilson insisted that the treaty provide for the creation of the League of Nations. This organization was designed to maintain peace among the countries of the world. The United States Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles, however. As a result, the United States never joined the League of Nations.
World War I: The First Modern War First Facts About U.S. History. 1996. 1914: An assassination in Bosnia touches off World War I President Woodrow Wilson declares the United States neutral 1917: The United States enters the war 1918: An armistice ends the war 1920: The U.S. Senate rejects American membership in the League of Nations “We crouched in our trenches,” an American soldier wrote, “peering past the rolls of barbed wire and ‘no man’s land,’ dreading the command that would send us ‘over the top.’” World War I, which began in Europe in August 1914, was the first war fought with modern weapons, such as tanks, machine guns, and submarines. The United States tried to remain neutral as the Central Powers, led by Germany, engaged in a deadly struggle against the Allied Powers, led by Great Britain and France. As both sides dug deep down in trenches along a 600-mile war front, the loss of life was devastating. In one battle that lasted six months, 650,000 men were killed or wounded—but only a few square miles of land changed hands. The United States entered the war on the Allied side in 1917, partly because German submarines had preyed on American ships. Although Americans came late to the conflict, they played a key role. In the fall of 1918, more than a million American soldiers fought through the Argonne Forest in France for 47 days. The massive assault helped break the last German offensive. Germany finally agreed to an armistice on November 11, 1918. Hoping to avoid a future world war, the nations of the world formed the League of Nations in 1919. But the brutality of the war had convinced most Americans that it was best to stay out of “Europe’s wars,” and the United States refused to join the League.
World War I The United States paid a price for its growing status in world politics. In 1914 war broke out in Europe. On one side were the Central Powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria. On the other side were the Allies—more than 20 nations led by Britain and France. The United States tried to remain neutral. The American people reelected President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 partly because he had kept the country out of the war. By 1917, however, the United States found it impossible to remain outside the struggle. Soon after German submarines began sinking U.S. ships, the United States declared war on the Central Powers. Two million U.S. soldiers helped the Allies to victory on the battlefields of Europe. The fighting ended in November 1918. (See also World War I.) The peace treaty that officially ended the war was signed in Versailles, France, in 1919. President Wilson insisted that the treaty provide for the creation of the League of Nations. This organization was designed to maintain peace among the countries of the world. The United States Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles, however. As a result, the United States never joined the League of Nations.
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