Welcome to Clip from Spiral logo

Interactive video lesson plan for: Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy

Activity overview:

Neuroscientist James Fallon discusses how he came to discover, and how he's learned to live with, the fact that he's a borderline psychopath. Fallon is the author of The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain (http://goo.gl/ioGrhS).

Don't miss new Big Think videos!  Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5


Transcript: My book, The Psychopath Inside, is a memoir and it's a mix of a personal story and what the science is, that is, the psychiatry and the genetics and the neuroscience behind what the subject is which is psychopathy. But it's really a story about somebody, me, who at 60 finds out he's not really who he thought he was all along in his whole life. And not until I had just by serendipity, by chance, started to run across biological evidence first from PET scans, positron emission tomography scans, that I was involved with -- acted as a control in one study in Alzheimer's disease and also had my genetics done. So it was just as a control and to compare to other people with Alzheimer's. And so it was through that about, oh, seven years ago that I found out something very strange. And this something strange both in terms of my brain pattern and genetics happened to run, it intersected with another study I had been doing -- a minor study on looking at PET scans and FMRIs, another kind of brain scan, and SPEC scans of killers, really bad murderers.

And these are particularly bad hombres and some serial killers, et cetera. And I had looked at these and had been asked to analyze them over the years from the early 1990s onward. And about the same time, 2005, when I was doing my own scans for this Alzheimer's study I had a whole group of these killers and also psychopaths and looked at a pattern. I said, "My God, there's a pattern in the brain for these guys." And so I started to talk about it, give talks and, you know, at academic institutions and psychiatry departments, law schools, et cetera, just to kind of vet the idea. But at the same time I got this pile of scans back that included my own and these other controls. And I was looking through -- I got to the last scan of that study of the Alzheimer's and I looked at it and I asked my technician. I said, "You've got to check the machine because this is obviously one of the killers." One of the murderers. It looked like really a severe case of brain activity loss in a psychopath.

And so when I ultimately they said, "No, this is part of -- it's in this control group." And I had to tear back the name on it because I always do everything blind but this was like something's really wrong. And it turned out to be my name. So it was like, you know, Gandalf shows up at the door and you're it. So that started this whole trajectory. Now at first I laughed at it and I just didn't care. We were so busy working on the genetics of Alzheimer's and also schizophrenia and I had just started an adult STEM cell company. And so I was so busy with stuff I kind of let it go for a couple of years really -- about a year and a half. But then the genetics came back and I had all the genetic alleles, the forms of the genes that are associated with a high aggression and violence, psychopathy, and a low kind of empathy, that intrapersonal emotional empathy. And low anxiety.

And when I got that back I started to take a little bit of note but I still didn't care about it. And it wasn't until I ended up giving a talk. I was asked to give a talk with the ex-prime minister of Oslo who had bipolar disorder. And so I went to Oslo to give a public talk with him, the clinician, on bipolar. You know, what's the brain patterns. And I had to use my own example of how you do imaging genetics. Take imaging of the brain, genetics, put it together in a mathematical model and how we figure it out so it can be used for all sorts of psychiatry medicine. And in the audience were all these psychiatrists there and I went through my own pathologies if you will and near clinical syndromes and my genetics and my brain scan. And at the end the head of the department there said, "You don't even know this I bet but you're bipolar first of all because you don't have the kind of bipolar in the United States that they use, one of the kinds." So this is interesting. [TRANSCRIPT TRUNCATED]

Directed/Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Elizabeth Rodd, and Dillon Fitton

Tagged under: Big Think,BigThink,BigThink.,Education,Educational,Lifelong Learning,EDU,Psychopathy (Disease Or Medical Condition),James Fallon,Neuroscientist (Profession),compassion,empathy,Narcissism (Symptom),DSM,Brain,Mind,Behavior,psychology,biology,PET,MRI,Brain Scan,Alzheimer' Disease (Disease Or Medical Condition),Medicine (Field Of Study),revenge

Clip makes it super easy to turn any public video into a formative assessment activity in your classroom.

Add multiple choice quizzes, questions and browse hundreds of approved, video lesson ideas for Clip

Make YouTube one of your teaching aids - Works perfectly with lesson micro-teaching plans

Play this activity

1. Students enter a simple code

2. You play the video

3. The students comment

4. You review and reflect

* Whiteboard required for teacher-paced activities

Share on:

Share Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy on Google+ Share Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy on Twitter Share Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy on Facebook Pin Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy Email Discovering One's Hidden Psychopathy

Ready to see what else Spiral logo can do?

With four apps, each designed around existing classroom activities, Spiral gives you the power to do formative assessment with anything you teach.

Quickfire

Carry out a quickfire formative assessment to see what the whole class is thinking

Discuss

Create interactive presentations to spark creativity in class

Team Up

Student teams can create and share collaborative presentations from linked devices

Clip

Turn any public video into a live chat with questions and quizzes

1000s of teachers use Spiral to deliver awesome, engaging activities that capture students' understanding during lessons.

Now it's your turn Sign up

Spiral Reviews by Teachers and Digital Learning Coaches

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Kathryn Laster @kklaster

Tried out the canvas response option on @SpiralEducation & it's so awesome! Add text or drawings AND annotate an image! #R10tech

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Room 220 Math Stars @3rdgradeBCE

Using @SpiralEducation in class for math review. Student approved! Thumbs up! Thanks.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Miss Ord @ordmiss

Absolutely amazing collaboration from year 10 today. 100% engagement and constant smiles from all #lovetsla #spiral

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Adam J. Stryker @strykerstennis

Students show better Interpersonal Writing skills than Speaking via @SpiralEducation Great #data #langchat folks!

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Dr Ayla Göl @iladylayla

A good tool for supporting active #learning.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Brett Erenberg @BrettErenberg

The Team Up app is unlike anything I have ever seen. You left NOTHING out! So impressed!

Get the Clip Chrome Extension & Create Video Lessons in Seconds

Add Clip to Chrome