Welcome to Clip from Spiral logo

Interactive video lesson plan for: What the Genomic Revolution Means to You

Activity overview:

Send a man to the Moon in one decade. Sequence the human genome in 15 years.

The genome was sequenced ahead of schedule. It took 13 years. But the work didn't exactly stop there. The Human Genome Project gave us the genomic blueprint, the ordering of the letters of our genome—all three billion of them. Scientists then had to try to "read those letters, understand that language, figure out that grammar," explains Eric Green, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute.

This challenge required the development of computational methods that would allow scientists to interpret which parts of these three billion letters "are actually doing something biologically important," Green told Big Think in a recent interview. For instance, what role do differences in genomes play in human disease? That's the great frontier in biomedical research.

The scientific advances, however, "are coming fast and furious," Green says, and so it is becoming increasingly important for the general public to become familiar with aspects of genomics that will impact "routine medical care in profound ways."

This realization led Green to initiate a partnership with the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian and the debut of an exhibition called "Genome: Unlocking Life's Code" on the tenth anniversary of the completion of the Human Genome Project.

The multimedia exhibition—on view at the National Museum of Natural History through Sept. 1, 2014—is designed to provide the general public with the most cutting edge information.

So how will the genomic revolution affect your life?

"Nobody ever keeps up with Moore's Law except the computer industry," says Green, referring to the observation that computer processing power doubles roughly every 18 months.

Even by using "the old fashioned method" of DNA sequencing, Green says the genome project kept up with Moore's Law quite effectively. Now that sequencing methods have been sufficiently industrialized, progress in the field of genomics has actually outpaced Moore's Law.

In the video below, Green explains how new technologies for sequencing DNA are becoming increasingly small and increasingly cheap. One such device plugs into the USB port of a laptop computer. "I'm told it can sequence a human genome in something like a day," Green says.

"Genome: Unlocking Life's Code" will be on view at the National Museum of Natural History through Sept. 1, 2014, when it will begin a tour of venues throughout North America.

Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler and Dillon Fitton

Tagged under: Big Think,BigThink,BigThink.,Education,Educational,Lifelong Learning,EDU,Moore' Law,Eric Green,Genome,National Human Genome Research Institute,Science,Future,Technology,DNA,USB,Sequencing,Genetics,Genes,Genomics (Technology Class)

Clip makes it super easy to turn any public video into a formative assessment activity in your classroom.

Add multiple choice quizzes, questions and browse hundreds of approved, video lesson ideas for Clip

Make YouTube one of your teaching aids - Works perfectly with lesson micro-teaching plans

Play this activity

1. Students enter a simple code

2. You play the video

3. The students comment

4. You review and reflect

* Whiteboard required for teacher-paced activities

Share on:

Share What the Genomic Revolution Means to You on Google+ Share What the Genomic Revolution Means to You on Twitter Share What the Genomic Revolution Means to You on Facebook Pin What the Genomic Revolution Means to You Email What the Genomic Revolution Means to You

Ready to see what else Spiral logo can do?

With four apps, each designed around existing classroom activities, Spiral gives you the power to do formative assessment with anything you teach.

Quickfire

Carry out a quickfire formative assessment to see what the whole class is thinking

Discuss

Create interactive presentations to spark creativity in class

Team Up

Student teams can create and share collaborative presentations from linked devices

Clip

Turn any public video into a live chat with questions and quizzes

1000s of teachers use Spiral to deliver awesome, engaging activities that capture students' understanding during lessons.

Now it's your turn Sign up

Spiral Reviews by Teachers and Digital Learning Coaches

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Kathryn Laster @kklaster

Tried out the canvas response option on @SpiralEducation & it's so awesome! Add text or drawings AND annotate an image! #R10tech

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Room 220 Math Stars @3rdgradeBCE

Using @SpiralEducation in class for math review. Student approved! Thumbs up! Thanks.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Miss Ord @ordmiss

Absolutely amazing collaboration from year 10 today. 100% engagement and constant smiles from all #lovetsla #spiral

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Adam J. Stryker @strykerstennis

Students show better Interpersonal Writing skills than Speaking via @SpiralEducation Great #data #langchat folks!

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Dr Ayla Göl @iladylayla

A good tool for supporting active #learning.

Spiral
Review of Spiral by teacher: Brett Erenberg @BrettErenberg

The Team Up app is unlike anything I have ever seen. You left NOTHING out! So impressed!

Get the Clip Chrome Extension & Create Video Lessons in Seconds

Add Clip to Chrome